On this Day, October 1 – F-86 Takes Flight

On this Day, October 1 – F-86 Takes Flight

On October 1,1947, after three years development, the first prototype North American Aviation XP-86 (NAA designation NA-140), serial number 45-59597, was ready for its first flight at Muroc Dry Lake in the high desert, north of Los Angeles, California.

Completed at North American’s Inglewood plant on 8 August 1947, the new aircraft was trucked to Muroc in mid-September. It was reassembled, everything was checked out, and after a few taxi tests, company test pilot George S. Welch took off for a initial familiarization flight. Chief Test Pilot Bob Chilton flew chase in an XP-82 Twin Mustang with a company photographer on board. The duration of the first flight was 1 hour, 18 minutes.

The XP-86 was initially powered by a General Electric-designed, Chevrolet-built J35-C-3 turbojet which produced 4,000 pounds of thrust. This was soon changed to an Allison J35-A-5. Performance testing was conducted with the Allison engine installed. The J35 was a single-spool, axial-flow turbojet engine with an 11-stage compressor and single-stage turbine. The J35-A-5 was rated at 4,000 pounds of thrust at 7,700 rpm (static thrust, Sea Level).

The F-86 Sabre Jet went on to be one of the most successful jet fighters and proved itself effective during encounters with the Soviet MiG-15 during the Korean War.

Updated: October 1, 2020 — 10:22 AM
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