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History: First President to Fly

History: First President to Fly

Roosevelt Wasted No Time Being the First Prez to Fly The very name of Theodore Roosevelt brings up an image of a man of limitless energy, always seeking new adventures. In 1910, he added another one to his list when he flew in an airplane. Roosevelt started life as a sickly child, but he didn’t […]
Photo by Chief Warrant Officer 4 Daniel McClinton, 1st ACB
October 15, 2007

An AH-64D Apache from Company B, 1st "Attack" Battalion, 227th Aviation Regiment, 1st Air Cavalry Brigade, 1st Cavalry Division, flies over a residential area in the Multi-National Division-Baghdad area Oct. 12. The Apache crew was conducting a reconnaissance mission to keep an eye out for enemy mortar and anti-aircraft systems.

On This Day in Aviation History

1918 – Death of Cecil Vernon Gardner, British World War I flying ace, from wounds received in actions three days before. 1932 – The only RWD-7, a Polish high-wing, single-engine sports plane, is flown by its designer Jerzy Drzewiecki and Antoni Kocjan, to a record height of 19,755 feet. 1964 – Birth of Stephen Nathaniel […]

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Silent Targets: The glider gang behind the trees

Silent Targets: The glider gang behind the trees

During the National WW II Glider Pilots Association’s 41st reunion in Oklahoma City in October 2011, glider pilots George L. Williams of Idaho and Norman C. Wilmeth of Oklahoma shared memories of their D-Day glider missions with the author.   MISSION ELMIRA Normandy D-Day Flight Officer George L. Williams flew seven glider missions during World […]
Luftwaffe’s  Bf 109E “Emil”

Luftwaffe’s Bf 109E “Emil”

Apart from its combat record, the Bf 109 remains a historic aircraft for sheer numbers produced. More than seven decades after WWII, only the Ilyushin Il-2 Sturmovik exceeds the Messerschmitt’s total of 34,000 produced, even under the pressure of continual Allied bombing. Nothing else comes close. Frequently, the Soviet Yakovlev fighter series is compared to […]

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Caudron C.460: Ancient Speed Demon Reborn

Caudron C.460: Ancient Speed Demon Reborn

Speed has always been a drug, of sorts. It has captivated mankind for as long as he has stood on two legs and nowhere has the urge to see who is the fastest been stronger than in aviation. And at no time has that competition been more fierce than during the 1930s, the uncontested golden […]
Fixin’ the Boat: Of Splinters and Tail Hooks

Fixin’ the Boat: Of Splinters and Tail Hooks

The reason why the earlier U.S. aircraft carriers had flight decks covered with wood as opposed to steel has been a mystery to many. Most will tell you that all of the decks were with teakwood. This may have been the preferred material, but beginning in 1941, most of the world’s teakwood was found in […]

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Wingman to the Aces

Wingman to the Aces

There are no great aces without great wingmen and young Lt. Floyd Fulkerson from Little Rock, Arkansas, was one of those wingmen. Although he had four confirmed victories, so he was nearly an ace himself, he sees his primary contribution to the war effort to have been the protection of his lead pilots, some of […]
10  Aviation  Myths  of World War II Fact vs. Fiction

10 Aviation Myths of World War II Fact vs. Fiction

Seventy years later, the Second World War remains the defining event of the 20th century and for the generations who experienced it. It led to the half-century Cold War and still shapes the geopolitical map today. Decades of lies and legends still swirl around the crucial events of mankind’s greatest conflict, and many of them […]

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Grasshopper Roundup

Grasshopper Roundup

In the summer of 1941, with a world war knocking at America’s door, the U.S. Army was itching for a “low and slow” observation plane. The Army wanted one that could loiter near and over the hidden enemy and, when spotted, could then coordinate with artillery units to rain destruction down upon the foe. During […]
On This Day in Aviation History

On This Day in Aviation History

1906 – Robert Albert Charles Esnault-Pelterie makes a towed flight of more than 1,600 feet in a glider he equipped with ailerons. 1925 – Birth of Masajiro “Mike” Kawato, Japanese World War II fighter ace. 1945 – The No. 273 Squadron of the Royal Air Force, equipped with Supermarine Spitfire IXs, is deployed to Tan […]
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