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Photo Tour of Oshkosh

137 Photos

Date: 08/09/2012

Last Updated: 07/28/2012

B-17G

Shoo Shoo Baby is the name of a B-17 Flying Fortress in World War II, preserved and on public display. A B-17G-35-BO, serial number 42-32076, and manufactured by Boeing, it was named by her crew for a song of the same name made popular by The Andrews Sisters, the favorite song of its crew chief T/Sgt. Hank Cordes. The B-17 flew 24 combat missions from England with the 91st BG, with three other missions aborted for mechanical problems, before being listed as missing in action on May 29, 1944. On its final mission, to the Focke Wulf aircraft component factory at Poznań, Poland, it crash-landed at Malmö Airport, Sweden.

22 Photos

Date: 10/06/2011

Last Updated: 10/06/2011

Curtiss P-40 Warhawk

The Curtiss P-40 Warhawk was an American single-engine, single-seat, all-metal fighter and ground attack aircraft that first flew in 1938. The P-40 design was a modification of the previous Curtiss P-36 Hawk which reduced development time and enabled a rapid entry into production and operational service. The Warhawk was used by the air forces of 28 nations, including those of most Allied powers during World War II, and remained in front line service until the end of the war. It was the third most-produced American fighter, after the P-51 and P-47; by November 1944, when production of the P-40 ceased, 13,738 had been built, all at Curtiss-Wright Corporation's main production facilities at Buffalo, New York.

4 Photos

Date: 10/06/2011

Last Updated: 10/06/2011

Waco Bipe

4 Photos

Date: 10/06/2011

Last Updated: 10/06/2011

Thunderbolt

2 Photos

Date: 10/06/2011

Last Updated: 10/06/2011

Douglas A-1 Skyraider

The Douglas A-1 Skyraiderwas an American single-seat attack aircraft that saw service between the late 1940s and early 1980s. It became a piston-powered, propeller-driven anachronism in the jet age, and was nicknamed "Spad", after a French World War I fighter. The Skyraider had a remarkably long and successful career and inspired the straight-winged, slow-flying, jet-powered successor, the A-10 Thunderbolt II.

3 Photos

Date: 10/06/2011

Last Updated: 10/06/2011

Ryan SC

Designed as an up-market version of the Ryan S-T trainer, the S-C was a low-wing cantilever monoplane with a fixed tailwheel landing gear. The prototype first flew in 1937 and had a nose-mounted 150 hp (112 kW) Menasco inline piston engine. Production aircraft were fitted with a 145 hp (108 kW) Warner Super Scarab radial engine. With the company's involvement in producing trainer aircraft for the United States military, the S-C was not seriously marketed and only 12 production aircraft were built. One example was impressed into service with the United States Army Air Force and was designated the L-10. Four examples were still flying in the United States at the start of the 21st Century.

2 Photos

Date: 10/06/2011

Last Updated: 10/06/2011

P-51D Mustang

The North American Aviation P-51 Mustang was an American long-range, single-seat fighter and fighter-bomber used during World War II, the Korean War and in several other conflicts. During World War II Mustang pilots claimed 4,950 enemy aircraft shot down, the most of any Allied fighter.

14 Photos

Date: 10/06/2011

Last Updated: 10/06/2011

Mitsubishi A6M (

The Mitsubishi A6M ("Zero") was a primary Japanese naval fighter in World War II. It was used by Imperial Japanese Navy pilots throughout the war, including in kamikaze attacks during the later stages. Allied pilots were astounded by its maneuverability, and it was very successful in combat until the Allies devised tactics to utilize their advantage in firepower and diving speed.

6 Photos

Date: 10/06/2011

Last Updated: 10/06/2011

Lockheed 12A

The Lockheed Model 12 Electra Junior, more commonly known as the Lockheed 12 or L-12, is an eight-seat, six-passenger all-metal twin-engine transport aircraft of the late 1930s designed for use by small airlines, companies, and wealthy private individuals. A scaled-down version of the Lockheed Model 10 Electra, the Lockheed 12 was not popular as an airliner but was widely used as a corporate and government transport.

3 Photos

Date: 10/06/2011

Last Updated: 10/06/2011

Jeff Ethel P-38

2 Photos

Date: 10/06/2011

Last Updated: 10/06/2011

Hawker Hurricane

The Hawker Hurricane is a British single-seat fighter aircraft that was designed and predominantly built by Hawker Aircraft Ltd for the Royal Air Force (RAF). Although largely overshadowed by the Supermarine Spitfire, the aircraft became renowned during the Battle of Britain, accounting for 60% of the RAF's air victories in the battle, and served in all the major theatres of WWII.

7 Photos

Date: 10/06/2011

Last Updated: 10/06/2011

F-86 Sabre

The North American F-86 Sabre (sometimes called the Sabrejet) was a transonic jet fighter aircraft. Produced by North American Aviation, the Sabre is best known as America's first swept wing fighter which could counter the similarly-winged Soviet MiG-15 in high speed dogfights over the skies of the Korean War. Considered one of the best and most important fighter aircraft in the Korean War, the F-86 is also rated highly in comparison with fighters of other eras.

5 Photos

Date: 10/06/2011

Last Updated: 10/06/2011

F3F2 Bipe

3 Photos

Date: 10/06/2011

Last Updated: 10/06/2011

DeHavilland Tiger Moth

The de Havilland DH 82 Tiger Moth is a 1930s biplane designed by Geoffrey de Havilland and was operated by the Royal Air Force (RAF) and others as a primary trainer. The Tiger Moth remained in service with the RAF until replaced by the de Havilland Chipmunk in 1952, when many of the surplus aircraft entered civil operation.

5 Photos

Date: 10/06/2011

Last Updated: 10/06/2011

D-17 Staggerwing Beechcraft

The Beechcraft Model 17 Staggerwing is an American biplane with an atypical negative stagger (the lower wing is further forward than the upper wing), that first flew in 1932.

3 Photos

Date: 10/06/2011

Last Updated: 10/06/2011

Corsair Mustangs

3 Photos

Date: 10/06/2011

Last Updated: 10/06/2011

Douglas C-47 Skytrain

The Douglas C-47 Skytrain or Dakota is a military transport aircraft that was developed from the Douglas DC-3 airliner. It was used extensively by the Allies during World War II and remained in front line operations through the 1950s with a few remaining in operation to this day.

2 Photos

Date: 10/06/2011

Last Updated: 10/06/2011

C-3

2 Photos

Date: 10/06/2011

Last Updated: 10/06/2011

Boeing P-12E

The Boeing P-12 or F4B was an American pursuit aircraft that was operated by the United States Army Air Corps and United States Navy.

3 Photos

Date: 10/06/2011

Last Updated: 10/06/2011

Bellanca Aircruiser

The Bellanca Aircruiser and Airbus were high-wing, single engine aircraft built by Bellanca Aircraft Corporation of New Castle, Delaware. The aircraft was built as a "workhorse" intended for use as a passenger or cargo aircraft. It was available as land, sea or ski plane. The aircraft was powered by either a Wright Cyclone or Pratt and Whitney Hornet engine. The Airbus and Aircruiser served as both a commercial and military transport.

2 Photos

Date: 10/06/2011

Last Updated: 10/06/2011

B-25 Desert Sand

2 Photos

Date: 10/06/2011

Last Updated: 10/06/2011

B-24

The Consolidated B-24 Liberator was an American heavy bomber, designed by Consolidated Aircraft Company of San Diego, California. Its mass production was brought into full force by 1943 with the aid of the Ford Motor Company through its newly-constructed Willow Run facility, where peak production had reached one B-24 per hour and 650 per month in 1944. The B-24's most infamous mission was the low-level strike against the Ploiești oil fields, in Romania on 1 August 1943, which turned into a disaster because the enemy was underestimated, fully alerted and attackers disorganized.

2 Photos

Date: 10/06/2011

Last Updated: 10/06/2011

Boeing B-17 Flying Fortress

The Boeing B-17 Flying Fortress is a four-engine heavy bomber aircraft developed in the 1930s for the then-United States Army Air Corps (USAAC). Competing against Douglas and Martin for a contract to build 200 bombers, the Boeing entry outperformed both competitors and more than met the Air Corps' expectations. Although Boeing lost the contract because the prototype crashed, the Air Corps was so impressed with Boeing's design that they ordered 13 more B-17s for further evaluation. From its introduction in 1938, the B-17 Flying Fortress evolved through numerous design advances.

4 Photos

Date: 10/06/2011

Last Updated: 10/06/2011

Aviation T-6 Texan

The North American Aviation T-6 Texan was a single-engine advanced trainer aircraft used to train pilots of the United States Army Air Forces, United States Navy, Royal Air Force and other air forces of the British Commonwealth during World War II and into the 1950s. Designed by North American Aviation, the T-6 is known by a variety of designations depending on the model and operating air force. The USAAC designated it as the "AT-6", the US Navy the "SNJ", and British Commonwealth air forces, the Harvard, the name it is best known by outside of the United States. It remains a popular warbird aircraft.

3 Photos

Date: 10/06/2011

Last Updated: 10/06/2011

Republic P-47 Thunderbolt

Republic Aviation's P-47 Thunderbolt, also known as the "Jug", was the largest, heaviest, and most expensive fighter aircraft in history to be powered by a single reciprocating engine.[2] It was heavily armed with eight .50-caliber machine guns, four per wing. When fully loaded, the P-47 weighed up to eight tons. The P-47, based on the powerful Pratt & Whitney R-2800 Double Wasp engine, was very effective in high-altitude air-to-air combat and proved especially adept at ground attack.

43 Photos

Date: 08/23/2011

Last Updated: 10/06/2011

P-38

21 Photos

Date: 08/23/2011

Last Updated: 10/06/2011

B-25 Mitchell

The North American B-25 Mitchell was an American twin-engined medium bomber manufactured by North American Aviation. It was used by many Allied air forces, in every theater of World War II, as well as many other air forces after the war ended, and saw service across four decades. The B-25 was named in honor of General Billy Mitchell, a pioneer of U.S. military aviation. By the end of its production, nearly 10,000 B-25s in numerous models had been built. These included a few limited variations, such as the United States Navy's and Marine Corps' PBJ-1 patrol bomber and the United States Army Air Forces' F-10 photo reconnaissance aircraft.

8 Photos

Date: 09/28/2011

Last Updated: 10/06/2011

Howard Hughes

Hughes was a lifelong aircraft enthusiast and pilot. At Rogers Airport in Los Angeles, he learned to fly from pioneer aviators, including Moye Stephens. He set many world records and commissioned the construction of custom aircraft to be built for himself while heading Hughes Aircraft at the airport in Glendale. Operating from there, the most technologically important aircraft he commissioned was the Hughes H-1 Racer. On September 13, 1935, Hughes, flying the H-1, set the landplane airspeed record of 352 mph (566 km/h) over his test course near Santa Ana, California (Giuseppe Motta reached 362 mph in 1929 and George Stainforth reached 407.5 mph in 1931, both in seaplanes). A year and a half later, on January 19, 1937, flying a redesigned H-1 Racer featuring extended wings, Hughes set a new transcontinental airspeed record by flying non-stop from Los Angeles to Newark in 7 hours, 28 minutes and 25 seconds (beating his own previous record of 9 hours, 27 minutes). His average ground speed over the flight was 322 mph.

12 Photos

Date: 09/28/2011

Last Updated: 09/28/2011

Warbirds

10 Photos

Date: 08/23/2011

Last Updated: 08/23/2011

Luftwaffe

22 Photos

Date: 08/23/2011

Last Updated: 08/23/2011

Vought F4U Corsair

The Vought F4U Corsair was a carrier-capable fighter aircraft that saw service primarily in World War II and the Korean War.

35 Photos

Date: 08/23/2011

Last Updated: 08/23/2011

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