Flight Journal http://www.flightjournal.com Fri, 22 Aug 2014 16:23:18 +0000 en-US hourly 1 On This Day in Aviation History http://www.flightjournal.com/blog/2014/08/22/on-this-day-in-aviation-history-353/ http://www.flightjournal.com/blog/2014/08/22/on-this-day-in-aviation-history-353/#comments Fri, 22 Aug 2014 16:19:57 +0000 Mike Harbour http://www.flightjournal.com/?p=214547

1882 – Birth of Raymonde de Laroche (born Elise Raymonde Deroche), French aviatrix and the first woman in the world to receive an airplane pilot’s license. 1916 – Austro-Hungarian World War I aces Julius Arigi and Johann Lasi score their first five victories, in a Hansa-Brandenburg C.I, on a single mission. 1951 – The USS Essex [...]

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1882 – Birth of Raymonde de Laroche (born Elise Raymonde Deroche), French aviatrix and the first woman in the world to receive an airplane pilot’s license.

1916 – Austro-Hungarian World War I aces Julius Arigi and Johann Lasi score their first five victories, in a Hansa-Brandenburg C.I, on a single mission.

1951 – The USS Essex (CV-9) joins Task Force 77 off the northeast coast of Korea; embarked aboard her is Fighter Squadron 172 (VF-172), equipped with F2H-2 Banshee fighters. It is the first deployment of the Banshee to a war zone.

1952 – First flight of the Saunders-Roe SR.45 Princess (shown), a British six-engined flying boat; at the time, it is one of the largest aircraft in existence.

1965 – Death of John Lankester Parker, British aviator and chief test pilot for Short Brothers.

2006 – Pulkovo Aviation Enterprise Flight 612, a Tupolev Tu-154M, crashes near the Russian border over eastern Ukraine, killing all 170 people on board.

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USAF Reactivates Training Squadron http://www.flightjournal.com/blog/2014/08/22/usaf-reactivates-training-squadron/ http://www.flightjournal.com/blog/2014/08/22/usaf-reactivates-training-squadron/#comments Fri, 22 Aug 2014 15:56:10 +0000 Mike Harbour http://www.flightjournal.com/?p=214542

A storied fighter squadron at Tyndall Air Force Base in Florida will be reactivated to help train Lockheed Martin F-22 Raptor pilots. During a reactivation ceremony on the base, U.S. Air Force Lt. Col. Derek Wyler will assume command of the 2nd Fighter Training Squadron. The ceremony will begin at 10:02 a.m. — not 10:01 [...]

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A storied fighter squadron at Tyndall Air Force Base in Florida will be reactivated to help train Lockheed Martin F-22 Raptor pilots.

During a reactivation ceremony on the base, U.S. Air Force Lt. Col. Derek Wyler will assume command of the 2nd Fighter Training Squadron. The ceremony will begin at 10:02 a.m. — not 10:01 or 10:03 — in a nod to the 2nd squadron, and it will be held in Hangar 2 on Friday, which just happens to Aug. 22.

“Airmen are very proud of their squadron, its heritage and everything it stands for,” Lt. Col. Karl Schluter, 325th Operations Group adversary air director of operations, said in an email. “Therefore, everything associated with the 2nd will, within reason, involve a 2 — hence 10:02 for the start of the ceremony.”

For the complete story by Chris Olwell of The (Panama City, Fla.) News Herald, click here.

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On This Day in Aviation History http://www.flightjournal.com/blog/2014/08/21/on-this-day-in-aviation-history-352/ http://www.flightjournal.com/blog/2014/08/21/on-this-day-in-aviation-history-352/#comments Thu, 21 Aug 2014 20:27:15 +0000 Mike Harbour http://www.flightjournal.com/?p=214537

1879 – Birth of Claude Grahame White, English pioneer of aviation, and the first to make a night flight; he founded Grahame-White Aviation Co. 1918 – First flight of the Nieuport-Delage NiD 29, a French single-seat biplane fighter. 1942 – U.S. Marine Corps Major John Lucian Smith (shown) scores the first aerial victory by a [...]

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1879 – Birth of Claude Grahame White, English pioneer of aviation, and the first to make a night flight; he founded Grahame-White Aviation Co.

1918 – First flight of the Nieuport-Delage NiD 29, a French single-seat biplane fighter.

1942 – U.S. Marine Corps Major John Lucian Smith (shown) scores the first aerial victory by a Henderson Field-based aircraft (Cactus Air Force), shooting down a Mitsubishi A6M Zero over Guadalcanal.

1972 – Death of Albert Achard, French World War I flying ace.

1998 – A Lumbini Airways de Havilland Canada DHC-6 Twin Otter 300 crashes in a mountainous region of Nepal, killing all 18.

2012 – Afghan insurgents fire rockets at Bagram Airfield in Afghanistan, damaging the Boeing C-17 Globemaster III of U.S. Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Gen. Martin Dempsey while he is elsewhere on base. The damage forces Dempsey to use a different aircraft when he departs Afghanistan later that day.

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Navy Hornets Take Fight to ISIL http://www.flightjournal.com/blog/2014/08/21/navy-hornets-take-fight-to-isil/ http://www.flightjournal.com/blog/2014/08/21/navy-hornets-take-fight-to-isil/#comments Thu, 21 Aug 2014 19:48:50 +0000 Mike Harbour http://www.flightjournal.com/?p=214533

The commander on board the USS George H.W. Bush aircraft carrier overseeing the ongoing airstrikes in Iraq said Navy F/A-18s have flown at least 30 bombing missions against the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant, or ISIL, targets. Thus far, Navy planes have destroyed ISIL mobile artillery positions, convoys and other strategic targets including vehicles and [...]

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The commander on board the USS George H.W. Bush aircraft carrier overseeing the ongoing airstrikes in Iraq said Navy F/A-18s have flown at least 30 bombing missions against the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant, or ISIL, targets.

Thus far, Navy planes have destroyed ISIL mobile artillery positions, convoys and other strategic targets including vehicles and equipment captured by ISIL, said Navy Rear Adm. DeWolfe Miller, Commander, Carrier Strike Group Two told reporters by phone from the Arabian Gulf.

The Navy’s Boeing F/A-18 Hornets are configured with a host of air-to-air and air-to-ground weapons such as the GBU-54 500-pound laser-guided bombs dropped in Iraq.  Laser-guided bombs can be guided by a laser-designation from the air or nearby ground forces. The GBU-54s dropped in Iraq are known as Laser Joint Direct Attack Munitions or LJDAMS, which rely on GPS guidance to pinpoint their targets.

For the complete story by Kris Osborn of DefenseTech.org, click here.

Photo via DefenseTech.org

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CAF to Hold Air Power Expo at New Site http://www.flightjournal.com/blog/2014/08/19/214524/ http://www.flightjournal.com/blog/2014/08/19/214524/#comments Wed, 20 Aug 2014 01:05:15 +0000 Mike Harbour http://www.flightjournal.com/?p=214524

Story and photo by the Commemorative Air Force The Commemorative Air Force (CAF) is bringing “hands on” history to Dallas Oct. 3-5 when the world’s only flying Boeing B-29 Superfortress, “FIFI,” the famous North American P-51C “Tuskegee Airmen” and over a dozen other World War II military aircraft take center stage at their first event at Dallas [...]

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Story and photo by the Commemorative Air Force

The Commemorative Air Force (CAF) is bringing “hands on” history to Dallas Oct. 3-5 when the world’s only flying Boeing B-29 Superfortress, “FIFI,” the famous North American P-51C “Tuskegee Airmen” and over a dozen other World War II military aircraft take center stage at their first event at Dallas Executive Airport.

The event will be open to the public Friday through Sunday at 5303 Challenger Drive, bringing the sights, smells and sounds of World War II aviation history to south Dallas. Attractions will include the CAF’s Rise Above traveling educational exhibit – a 160-degree panoramic theater in which visitors watch a video highlighting the courage and determination of the Tuskegee Airmen during World War II. Participants will also tour the bomber cockpits, watch the airplanes fly and can even purchase rides in many of the visiting aircraft. These aircraft are powerful history lessons for young and old alike. The visual display combined with the enthusiasm and knowledge of CAF members will create an unforgettable experience for visitors.

Attending aircraft will include the B-29 Superfortress, P51C Mustang, P51D Mustang, SB2C Helldiver, B-24 Liberator, A-26 Invader and many other transport, liaison and trainer airplanes. Admission is $15 for adults and $5 for children age 6 through 17. Children age 5 and under are free. The cost for aircraft rides ranges from $65 to $1,995 depending on the airplane.

The Air Expo kicks off Thursday with a full day of educational programs for local students. Activities that day include the CAF Rise Above traveling educational exhibit which teaches students the story of men who overcame many obstacles to train and fight as U.S. Army Air Corps pilots during World War II and emphasizes what their spirit and hard work still mean to us 60 years later.

Former Tuskegee Airmen and other World War II Veterans will be on hand to talk with the students about all of the airplanes and their experiences during the war. In June, the CAF announced Dallas Executive Airport as the new location for its national headquarters. The organization plans to build a world-class aviation attraction at the airport. The World War II Air Expo, hosted by the CAF B-29/B-24 Squadron, offers Dallas residents their first opportunity to learn more about the organization.

For more information, click here.

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On This Day in Aviation History http://www.flightjournal.com/blog/2014/08/18/on-this-day-in-aviation-history-351/ http://www.flightjournal.com/blog/2014/08/18/on-this-day-in-aviation-history-351/#comments Mon, 18 Aug 2014 22:06:05 +0000 Mike Harbour http://www.flightjournal.com/?p=214519

1897 – Birth of Oliver Campbell Bryson, British World War I flying ace; he was one of the British aviators ordered to Russia in 1919 to support the White Army in its counter-revolution against the Bolsheviks. Bryson served in the Royal Air Force until 1943. 1930 – Eddie August Henry Schneider, flying a Scarab-powered Cessna, [...]

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1897 – Birth of Oliver Campbell Bryson, British World War I flying ace; he was one of the British aviators ordered to Russia in 1919 to support the White Army in its counter-revolution against the Bolsheviks. Bryson served in the Royal Air Force until 1943.

1930 – Eddie August Henry Schneider, flying a Scarab-powered Cessna, sets a east-to-west U.S. junior transcontinental record of 29 hours and 55 minutes in four days from Westfield, N.J.,  to Los Angeles, Calif.

1945 – In the last World War II Japanese combat mission, fighter ace Sadamu Komachi attacks two Consolidated B-32 Dominators on a photo-reconnaissance mission over Tokyo; only one B-32 was damaged but returned to base.

1965 – First flight of the Kamov Ka-26 (ag version shown), a Soviet light utility helicopter with co-axial rotors.

1988 – Death of Alexandr Vladimirovich Shchukin, Russian air force pilot and civilian Buran test pilot; he is killed in the crash of a Sukhoi Su-26M aerobatic plane at Zhukovsky Air Base near Moscow.

2012 – Suffering engine trouble, an Aviatour Air Piper PA-34 Seneca I crashes in the sea off Masbate in the Philippines, killing three of the four people on board and injuring the lone survivor; among the dead is Philippine Secretary of the Interior Jesse Robredo.

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X-47B Conducts Ops with Manned Aircraft http://www.flightjournal.com/blog/2014/08/18/x-47b-conducts-ops-with-manned-aircraft/ http://www.flightjournal.com/blog/2014/08/18/x-47b-conducts-ops-with-manned-aircraft/#comments Mon, 18 Aug 2014 21:33:13 +0000 Mike Harbour http://www.flightjournal.com/?p=214514

Story and photo by U.S. Navy The U.S. Navy’s unmanned X-47B returned to carrier operations aboard USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN 71) Aug. 17 and completed a series of tests, operating safely and seamlessly with manned aircraft. Building on lessons learned from its first test period aboard TR in November 2013, the X-47B team is now [...]

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Story and photo by U.S. Navy

The U.S. Navy’s unmanned X-47B returned to carrier operations aboard USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN 71) Aug. 17 and completed a series of tests, operating safely and seamlessly with manned aircraft.

Building on lessons learned from its first test period aboard TR in November 2013, the X-47B team is now focused on perfecting deck operations and performing maneuvers with manned aircraft in the flight pattern.

“Today we showed that the X-47B could take off, land and fly in the carrier pattern with manned aircraft while maintaining normal flight deck operations,” said Capt. Beau Duarte, program manager for the Navy’s Unmanned Carrier Aviation office. “This is key for the future Carrier Air Wing.”

The first series of manned/unmanned operations began this morning when the ship launched an F/A-18 and an X-47B. After an eight-minute flight, the X-47B executed an arrested landing, folded its wings and taxied out of the landing area. The deck-based operator used newly developed deck handling control to manually move the aircraft out of the way of other aircraft, allowing the F/A-18 to touch down close behind the X-47B’s recovery.

This cooperative launch and recovery sequence will be repeated multiple times over the course of the planned test periods. The X-47B performed multiple arrested landings, catapults, flight deck taxiing and deck refueling operations.

“For this test period, we really focused on integration with manned aircraft,” said Lt. Cmdr Brian Hall, X-47B flight test director. “We re-engineered the tailhook retract actuator and updated operating software to expedite wingfold during taxi, both of which reduce time in the landing area post-recovery. Our goal was to minimize the time in the landing area and improve the flow with manned aircraft in the landing pattern.”

“The X-47B’s air vehicle performance, testing efficiency and safety technologies and procedures developed and tested throughout the program’s execution have paved the way for the Navy’s future carrier-based unmanned system capability,” said Rear Adm. Mat Winter, who oversees the Program Executive Office for Unmanned Aviation and Strike Weapons.

The X-47B will remain aboard CVN 71 for the duration of the underway period. It will perform additional cooperative deck and flight operations with F/A-18s and complete night deck handling and flying quality evaluations.

The Navy will continue X-47B flight operations over the next year to refine the concept of operations to demonstrate the integration of unmanned carrier-based aircraft within the carrier environment and mature technologies for the future Unmanned Carrier Launched Airborne Surveillance and Strike system.

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On This Day in Aviation History http://www.flightjournal.com/blog/2014/08/15/on-this-day-in-aviation-history-350/ http://www.flightjournal.com/blog/2014/08/15/on-this-day-in-aviation-history-350/#comments Fri, 15 Aug 2014 19:18:21 +0000 Mike Harbour http://www.flightjournal.com/?p=214509

1935 – First flight of the Seversky P-35 (shown), a U.S. single-seat, all-metal fighter. 1937 – Lufthansa begins seaplane services between the Azores and New York with the assistance of seaplane tenders stationed along the route. 1945 – Birth of Charles Barbin “Chuck” DeBellevue, U.S. Air Force officer; he became the first USAF weapon systems officer (WSO) to [...]

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1935 – First flight of the Seversky P-35 (shown), a U.S. single-seat, all-metal fighter.

1937 – Lufthansa begins seaplane services between the Azores and New York with the assistance of seaplane tenders stationed along the route.

1945 – Birth of Charles Barbin “Chuck” DeBellevue, U.S. Air Force officer; he became the first USAF weapon systems officer (WSO) to become a flying ace.

1949 – A de Havilland Tiger Moth makes the first service flight by an aircraft of the Democratic Republic of Vietnam.

1953 – French aviatrix Jacqueline Auriol is the first European woman to break the sound barrier with a Dassault Mystère II.

1983 – Death of Robert Kenneth Whitney, Canadian World War I flying ace.

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Army Squadron Says Goodbye, For Now http://www.flightjournal.com/blog/2014/08/15/army-squadron-says-goodbye-for-now/ http://www.flightjournal.com/blog/2014/08/15/army-squadron-says-goodbye-for-now/#comments Fri, 15 Aug 2014 19:01:59 +0000 Mike Harbour http://www.flightjournal.com/?p=214505

It was a bittersweet goodbye for aviators and family members of a helicopter squadron Thursday morning at Joint Base Lewis-McChord in Washington state. They gathered to remember the legacy of the U.S. Army’s 4-6 Attack Reconnaissance Squadron— part of a U.S. Cavalry outfit, known as the “Fighting Sixth,” that dates back to the Civil War. [...]

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It was a bittersweet goodbye for aviators and family members of a helicopter squadron Thursday morning at Joint Base Lewis-McChord in Washington state.

They gathered to remember the legacy of the U.S. Army’s 4-6 Attack Reconnaissance Squadron— part of a U.S. Cavalry outfit, known as the “Fighting Sixth,” that dates back to the Civil War. And they witnessed the retirement of the squadron’s colors at an inactivation ceremony at Watkins Field.

The squadron is the first to be disbanded as part of a five-year plan to phase out all Bell OH-58 Kiowa helicopters in the Army. It’s also part of a larger postwar force reduction at JBLM that has resulted in the loss of one of the base’s 4,500-soldier Stryker brigades and a 500-soldier artillery battalion. Even deeper cuts may lie ahead.

For the complete story by Ryan Tarinelli of The (Tacoma, Wash.) News Tribune, click here.

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Fork-Tailed Oddballs http://www.flightjournal.com/blog/2014/08/14/fork-tailed-oddballs/ http://www.flightjournal.com/blog/2014/08/14/fork-tailed-oddballs/#comments Thu, 14 Aug 2014 18:30:14 +0000 Holly Hansen http://www.flightjournal.com/?p=213898

There’s the P-38 Lightning known and loved by generations — a large, yet lithe twin-engine, twin-boom fighter with an informed sense of streamlining that inspired descriptions like “three bullets on a knife.” The P-38 marched through the war generating alphabetical models through “M” totaling around 10,000 copies. But it would be facile to leave the [...]

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There’s the P-38 Lightning known and loved by generations — a large, yet lithe twin-engine, twin-boom fighter with an informed sense of streamlining that inspired descriptions like “three bullets on a knife.” The P-38 marched through the war generating alphabetical models through “M” totaling around 10,000 copies.

But it would be facile to leave the Lightning at that. The P-38 was a product of creative, yet disciplined thinkers like Kelly Johnson. How ironic that the elliptical twin tail appearance of the dumpy Hudson bomber was an icon of grace and style when applied to the P-38 and even the swooping Constellation airliner. Johnson’s P-38 team tweaked those signature tail shapes into something that followed slender booms radically housing the turbo-superchargers that gave the Lightning its punch at altitude. Modern tricycle landing gear, centrally mounted armament, and propellers rotating in opposite directions against the norm telegraphed the P-38 team’s willingness to innovate.

Not only could the P-38 deliver on its promise as an aggressive fighter, but serendipitously its large airframe gave the Lightning adaptability and flexible mission possibilities unattainable in smaller pursuits like the contemporary Bell P-39 Airacobra.

If the innovative Lightning design was promising enough to earn lucrative prewar orders for Lockheed, the eager P-38 team soon learned sobering lessons from testing as well as combat when war began. A variety of factors made the time ripe for experimenting with one-off Lightning variants to address technical and tactical problems. The United States entered a global war of unknown length in 1941. Americans euphemistically spoke of wartime necessities “for the duration,” the impossible-to-calculate length of the war ahead. In that atmosphere, the creative designers of the P-38 were both encouraged and compelled to experiment with their product to optimize its contributions to the ultimate Allied victory. Lt. Gen. Jimmy Doolittle endeavored to winnow out P-38s and even B-24s from his mighty Eighth Air Force in favor of P-51s and B-17s. Yet there is a curious kindred adaptability shared by both of the capacious airframe types that Doolittle shunned, while P-51s and B-17s strayed less from their one primary mission. Both Lightnings and Liberators ended the war with a reputation for adaptability.

Embracing an aircraft that was both fast and big, Lockheed set about taming the P-38’s foibles and expanding its résumé.

To read more, open the PDF by clicking the link: http://www.flightjournal.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/06/Fork-Tailed-Oddball.pdf?746277

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