Flight Journal http://www.flightjournal.com Wed, 28 Jan 2015 15:04:29 +0000 en-US hourly 1 On This Day in Aviation History http://www.flightjournal.com/blog/2015/01/27/on-this-day-in-aviation-history-428/ http://www.flightjournal.com/blog/2015/01/27/on-this-day-in-aviation-history-428/#comments Tue, 27 Jan 2015 21:20:46 +0000 Mike Harbour http://www.flightjournal.com/?p=215607

1920 – Birth of Hiroyoshi Nishizawa, Japanese World War II fighter ace. 1927 – First flight of the Douglas T2D (shown), an American twin-engine torpedo bomber; it is the first twin-engined aircraft to operate from an aircraft carrier. 1941 – The first British combined operation between Malta’s reconnaissance and strike aircraft takes place when the German vessel Ingo is [...]

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1920 – Birth of Hiroyoshi Nishizawa, Japanese World War II fighter ace.

1927 – First flight of the Douglas T2D (shown), an American twin-engine torpedo bomber; it is the first twin-engined aircraft to operate from an aircraft carrier.

1941 – The first British combined operation between Malta’s reconnaissance and strike aircraft takes place when the German vessel Ingo is sunk by the Fairey Swordfish of No.830 and No.806 Squadrons of the Royal Navy’s Fleet Air Arm.

1989 – Death of Thomas Sopwith, British aviation pioneer; he co-founded The Sopwith Aviation Co., which produced the Sopwith Camel.

1998 – A Myanmar National Airways Fokker F27 crashes on takeoff from Yangon, Myanmar, killing 16 people of the 45 aboard.

2002 – Boeing’s 737, the world’s most widely use twin jet, becomes the first jetliner in history to amass more than 100 million flying hours. The 737 was launched onto the market 1965.

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Mighty Eighth to Dedicate B-17 http://www.flightjournal.com/blog/2015/01/27/mighty-eighth-to-dedicate-b-17/ http://www.flightjournal.com/blog/2015/01/27/mighty-eighth-to-dedicate-b-17/#comments Tue, 27 Jan 2015 20:55:41 +0000 Mike Harbour http://www.flightjournal.com/?p=215601

After more than six years of painstaking restoration work, “City of Savannah,” a Boeing B-17G Flying Fortress owned by the National Museum of the Mighty Eighth Air Force, will be dedicated on Wednesday. The achievement was accomplished by museum volunteers following the bomber’s acquisition from the Smithsonian’s National Air & Space Museum in 2009. The January 28th [...]

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After more than six years of painstaking restoration work, “City of Savannah,” a Boeing B-17G Flying Fortress owned by the National Museum of the Mighty Eighth Air Force, will be dedicated on Wednesday.

The achievement was accomplished by museum volunteers following the bomber’s acquisition from the Smithsonian’s National Air & Space Museum in 2009. The January 28th dedication is no coincidence, as it also marks the 73rd anniversary for the activation of the Eighth Air Force during WWII in Savannah, Ga.

Tomorrow’s event will include an official dedication program, with various speakers and military dignitaries, including U.S. Air Force Major Gen. Scott A. Vander Hamm, the current Eighth Air Force commander. Along with honoring the many people who made the restoration possible, World War II veterans will be recognized as well, including many who served with B-17s. Family members of the crewmen who served in the original “City of Savannah” are also expected to attend. A light reception will follow the dedication service.

“City of Savannah” has a long history, being named after a brave crew and the city in which the Mighty Eighth Air Force originated. The restoration has involved more than 60,000 hours of labor from a team of over 140 volunteers.  The museum’s volunteers have worked together with other volunteers, interns, engineers, designers and instructors representing corporations and schools such as Gulfstream Aerospace, Chroma Corp., LMI, Savannah Tech and others. The aircraft, when completed, will be in its original combat configuration with radios and gun turrets in working order and available for demonstration. The museum is justifiably proud of their achievement and is thankful for the countless hours, teamwork and expertise offered by the many people who contributed to this restoration.

Henry Skipper, the museum’s president and CEO, predicts that its B-17 will be a huge draw and stand as one of the best examples of restored WWII-era aircraft in the world.

“City of Savannah is being dedicated as a symbol of the immeasurable contribution and sacrifice of the men of the 8th Air Force in WWII,” he said. “The project is a great example of teamwork between the many volunteers and the museum staff to get this job done, and done at the highest level.  People from all over the world will have the opportunity to view this iconic airplane and learn the history of the 8th Air Force by visiting this great museum.”

For more information, click here.

Story and photo by MightyEighth.org

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On This Day in Aviation History http://www.flightjournal.com/blog/2015/01/23/on-this-day-in-aviation-history-427/ http://www.flightjournal.com/blog/2015/01/23/on-this-day-in-aviation-history-427/#comments Fri, 23 Jan 2015 16:04:46 +0000 Mike Harbour http://www.flightjournal.com/?p=215596

1916 – Birth of Siegfried Schnell, German World War II flying ace. 1918 – First American Expeditionary Force (AEF) balloon ascent is made at the Balloon School at Cuperly in France. 1943 – The pilot of a Japanese Nakajima A6 M2-N (“Rufe”) floatplane fighter discovers American forces have occupied Amchitka. Japanese aircraft from Kiska begin frequent raids against [...]

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1916 – Birth of Siegfried Schnell, German World War II flying ace.

1918 – First American Expeditionary Force (AEF) balloon ascent is made at the Balloon School at Cuperly in France.

1943 – The pilot of a Japanese Nakajima A6 M2-N (“Rufe”) floatplane fighter discovers American forces have occupied Amchitka. Japanese aircraft from Kiska begin frequent raids against the island that day and continue them for almost four weeks.

1948 – First flight of the de Havilland Australia DHA-3 Drover (Mk.3A version shown), a small Australian transport; it is a derivative of the de Havilland Dove.

1961 – Death of Redford Henry “Red” Mulock, first Canadian World War I flying ace and the first in the Royal Naval Air Service; he also held a high-ranking Royal Canadian Air Force post-WWI before joining Canadian Airways.

1982 – World Airways Flight 30, a McDonnell-Douglas DC-10, overshoots the runway at Boston, Mass.; two passengers reported missing.

 

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South Korean Chopper Makes First Flight http://www.flightjournal.com/blog/2015/01/23/amphib-chopper-makes-first-flight/ http://www.flightjournal.com/blog/2015/01/23/amphib-chopper-makes-first-flight/#comments Fri, 23 Jan 2015 15:54:42 +0000 Mike Harbour http://www.flightjournal.com/?p=215592

Korea Aerospace Industries (KAI) has conducted the maiden flight of a Surion transport helicopter optimised for amphibious assault operations. On Monday, the modified Surion, also designated the Korea Utility Helicopter (KUH), flew for 30 minutes with two test pilots and two technicians on boards, says KAI. The sortie, which took place at KAI’s Sacheon factory, included [...]

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Korea Aerospace Industries (KAI) has conducted the maiden flight of a Surion transport helicopter optimised for amphibious assault operations. On Monday, the modified Surion, also designated the Korea Utility Helicopter (KUH), flew for 30 minutes with two test pilots and two technicians on boards, says KAI.

The sortie, which took place at KAI’s Sacheon factory, included ground tests, forward flight, backward flight, and hovering. The type is optimised for the South Korean marines, and features a foldable main rotor and an auxiliary fuel tank. The helicopter also has emergency floats that can be deployed in the event of a ditching.

Throughout 2015 the amphibious Surion will be tested in a range of environments, including cold weather and aboard ships.

For more photos and the complete story by Greg Waldron of Flightglobal.com, click here.

Photo by KAI

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On This Day in Aviation History http://www.flightjournal.com/blog/2015/01/22/on-this-day-in-aviation-history-426/ http://www.flightjournal.com/blog/2015/01/22/on-this-day-in-aviation-history-426/#comments Thu, 22 Jan 2015 19:35:30 +0000 Mike Harbour http://www.flightjournal.com/?p=215587

1889 – Birth of Harry George Hawker MBE, AFC, Australian aviation pioneer and co-founder of Hawker Aircraft. 1931 – First flight of the Bristol Type 118, a British general-purpose military aircraft, a two-seat biplane prototype for overseas markets. 1943 – Death of Edmond Eugene Henri Caillaux, French World War I flying ace. 1952 – The de Havilland Comet 1 (1A shown) becomes [...]

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1889 – Birth of Harry George Hawker MBE, AFC, Australian aviation pioneer and co-founder of Hawker Aircraft.

1931 – First flight of the Bristol Type 118, a British general-purpose military aircraft, a two-seat biplane prototype for overseas markets.

1943 – Death of Edmond Eugene Henri Caillaux, French World War I flying ace.

1952 – The de Havilland Comet 1 (1A shown) becomes the first turbojet-powered civil airliner to be awarded a certificate of airworthiness.

1969 – The U. S. 9th Marine Regiment begins Operation Dewey Canyon – an operation dependent completely on helicopters – in South Vietnam’s Da Krong Valley. It will conclude on March 19, rated as the 9th Marines’ most successful operation of the Vietnam War.

2010 – A Myanmar Air Force Chengdu F-7 fighter crashed while attempting to land at Yangon airport, killing its pilot.

 

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Udvar-Hazy Center Open House Saturday http://www.flightjournal.com/blog/2015/01/22/udvar-hazy-center-open-house-saturday/ http://www.flightjournal.com/blog/2015/01/22/udvar-hazy-center-open-house-saturday/#comments Thu, 22 Jan 2015 19:26:19 +0000 Mike Harbour http://www.flightjournal.com/?p=215582

Visitors will have a chance to see what goes into restoring, preserving and displaying America’s aviation and space treasures at the Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center Open House Saturday, Jan. 24.  For one day only, visitors can tour collections spaces usually off-limits to the public, including the Mary Baker Engen Restoration Hangar and the Emil Buehler [...]

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Visitors will have a chance to see what goes into restoring, preserving and displaying America’s aviation and space treasures at the Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center Open House Saturday, Jan. 24.  For one day only, visitors can tour collections spaces usually off-limits to the public, including the Mary Baker Engen Restoration Hangar and the Emil Buehler Conservation Laboratory. The daylong event includes demonstrations, presentations and hands-on activities for all age groups. Visitors can:

  • Meet curators, conservators, archivists and other specialists and learn how they care for objects in the museum’s collection.
  • Tour the Mary Baker Engen Restoration Hangar and see the museum’s current projects such as the Martin B-26B-25-MA Marauder “Flak-Bait” and the Apollo Telescope Mount.
  • Visit the Emil Buehler Conservation Laboratory and learn about how the museum restores and preserves artifacts like the original studio model of the Star Trek starship “Enterprise.”
  • Learn how aircraft are suspended for display in the Boeing Aviation Hangar (requires timed tickets; all other activities will be available to all visitors).
  • See how the museum’s most fragile artifacts are cared for and stored.
  • Discover the research that is needed before a restoration project can begin.
  • Get tips for photographing objects in the museum from a staff photographer.

Admission to the museum and Open House is free; parking is $15. The Open House is made possible through the support of FBR.

Since it opened in conjunction with the nation’s Centennial of Flight in 2003, the Udvar-Hazy Center has expanded in all areas, most notably because of a new wing devoted to collections care. The new section contains several state-of-the-art storage facilities for entire collections, such as spacesuits and works of art, as well as a conservation lab and processing units, and the Mary Baker Engen Restoration Hangar, a 48,000-square-foot facility large enough to house seven aircraft at the same time. The museum’s archival research facility, containing millions of documents, photographs and film and video collections, is also at the center. The number of major artifacts on display, arranged in thematic sections following a “displayed storage” design scheme, has risen from 348 in 2003 to 3,250 today.

For more information, click here.

Photo by Mark Avino, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution

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On This Day in Aviation History http://www.flightjournal.com/blog/2015/01/21/on-this-day-in-aviation-history-425/ http://www.flightjournal.com/blog/2015/01/21/on-this-day-in-aviation-history-425/#comments Wed, 21 Jan 2015 18:48:36 +0000 Mike Harbour http://www.flightjournal.com/?p=215578

1897 – Birth of Carlo Francesco “Francis” Lombardi, Italian World War I flying ace; he would also become an aircraft and automobile designer who made several post-war record breaking flights. 1917 – First flight of the Nielsen & Winther Type AA (shown), a single-seat, Danish-designed fighter. 1944 – Launch of Operation Steinbock (Baby Blitz), a nocturnal World War II Luftwaffe offensive against [...]

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1897 – Birth of Carlo Francesco “Francis” Lombardi, Italian World War I flying ace; he would also become an aircraft and automobile designer who made several post-war record breaking flights.

1917 – First flight of the Nielsen & Winther Type AA (shown), a single-seat, Danish-designed fighter.

1944 – Launch of Operation Steinbock (Baby Blitz), a nocturnal World War II Luftwaffe offensive against southern England launched primarily for the sake of propaganda and as a measure of retaliation than for any military objective

1951 – The U. S. Air Force F-84 Thunderjet, built by Republic, makes its first kill when pilot Lt. Col. William E. Bertram shoots down a Mikoyan Gurevich MiG-15 during the Korean War.

1973 – Death of François Portron, French World War I flying ace.

2009 – An Indian Air Force HAL HJT-16 Kiran Mk.2 military trainer aircraft from the No. 52 Squadron Surya Kiran (Sun Rays) Aerobatics display team, based at the Bidar Air Force Station in Karnataka, India, crashes into a field during a routine training exercise killing the pilot.

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UAE to Donate Super Tucanos to Iraq http://www.flightjournal.com/blog/2015/01/21/uae-to-donate-super-tucanos-to-iraq/ http://www.flightjournal.com/blog/2015/01/21/uae-to-donate-super-tucanos-to-iraq/#comments Wed, 21 Jan 2015 18:32:00 +0000 Mike Harbour http://www.flightjournal.com/?p=215574

The United Arab Emirates (UAE) is to supply Iraq with a number of Embraer EMB-314 Super Tucano light strike aircraft to help combat the Islamic State, a government official has reportedly disclosed. With IHS Jane’s having first reported that the UAE had recently ordered up to 24 Super Tucanos, the official told Defense News on Jan. 17 that the [...]

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The United Arab Emirates (UAE) is to supply Iraq with a number of Embraer EMB-314 Super Tucano light strike aircraft to help combat the Islamic State, a government official has reportedly disclosed.

With IHS Jane’s having first reported that the UAE had recently ordered up to 24 Super Tucanos, the official told Defense News on Jan. 17 that the emirates will transfer an undisclosed number to the Iraqi Air Force “before the end of the month”.

On Jan. 5, the Brazilian Air Force commander General Juniti Saito said that six of these 24 aircraft were to be supplied from the FAB’s own inventory so as to expedite deliveries. While these aircraft were to be handed over to the UAE “immediately,” there has been no official word as to whether they have indeed arrived.

For the complete story by Gareth Jennings of IHS Jane’s Defence Weekly, click here.

Photo by Embraer

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On This Day in Aviation History http://www.flightjournal.com/blog/2015/01/20/on-this-day-in-aviation-history-424/ http://www.flightjournal.com/blog/2015/01/20/on-this-day-in-aviation-history-424/#comments Tue, 20 Jan 2015 21:07:59 +0000 Mike Harbour http://www.flightjournal.com/?p=215569

1913 – Attempting to establish a new women’s altitude record, pioneering American female pilot Bernetta Miller is covered with oil and temporarily blinded when her oil flow indicator smashes. She makes a safe emergency landing in New York, N.Y. 1920 – Birth of Ferruccio Serafini, World War II Italian fighter ace. 1940 – The Brazilian Air Force, originally [...]

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1913 – Attempting to establish a new women’s altitude record, pioneering American female pilot Bernetta Miller is covered with oil and temporarily blinded when her oil flow indicator smashes. She makes a safe emergency landing in New York, N.Y.

1920 – Birth of Ferruccio Serafini, World War II Italian fighter ace.

1940 – The Brazilian Air Force, originally founded in 1908 as the Brazilian Army Balloon Corp, adopts its current title, Fôrça Aeréa Brasileira.

1965 – Death of Ludwig “Lutz” Beckmann, German World War I flying ace.

1971 – First flight of the Northrop Grumman E-2C Hawkeye (shown), an American naval tactical airborne early warning aircraft.

2013 – Islamist rebel forces withdraw from Diabaly, Mali, to avoid further airstrikes after days of bombing by French aircraft. French aircraft have flown 140 bombing sorties since the French intervention in Mali began.

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DC-3 Gooney – Memories of First Flight http://www.flightjournal.com/blog/2015/01/20/dc-3-gooney-memories-of-first-flight/ http://www.flightjournal.com/blog/2015/01/20/dc-3-gooney-memories-of-first-flight/#comments Tue, 20 Jan 2015 16:05:05 +0000 Budd Davisson http://www.flightjournal.com/?p=215533

Everyone has a first flight: Mine was in a Gooney Life is a million episodes stitched together to form a ragged continuum. However, regardless of how many episodes are involved, there is always the first one. This is especially true of those of us who have lived a sizeable portion of our lives in the [...]

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Everyone has a first flight: Mine was in a Gooney
Life is a million episodes stitched together to form a ragged continuum. However, regardless of how many episodes are involved, there is always the first one. This is especially true of those of us who have lived a sizeable portion of our lives in the air.

I’ve been an extremely active pilot for an amazing 57 years running up a total of around 7,500 hours in a wide variety of aircraft, glider to fighter, but there are two takeoffs that, in my mind, stand above all the others: my first real ride in an airplane and the day I soloed at 16 years old.

My first flight was in a venerable old DC-3, when I was around ten years old. I remember so clearly walking across the ramp in Lincoln, Nebraska, climbing up the short stairs to the rear door and walking uphill to my seat about a third of the way up the narrow fuselage. I remember the smell: a subtle combination of upholstery cleaner, av gas, hydraulic fluid and an aroma I’ll never forget and which still takes me back to that first flight every time I smell it. It was the smell of a still-hot radial engine. It affects the senses in a way that defies description because nothing else smells the same. Nothing!  I remember the way the gray upholstery with square doily-like white covers draped over the headrests felt. I remember climbing into my seat and scooting across to the window where I had a clear view of the left engine. It was as if I was a vibrating ball of sensors straining to take it all in and save it for eternity.

By that time in my life, like so many other pilots, I wasn’t just a ten-year-old-kid going for his first airline flight. I was an aviator-in-the-making with a long history in butchering balsa and trying to get little 1/2A gas motors to run long enough to get my models off the ground. Where the majority of the passengers were simply “there” in an unusual environment, I was where I’d dreamed I’d be almost from the moment I was able to form thoughts. I was in an airplane. A real live, ready-to-go airplane! Even at that age, I knew this was significant. It was right up there with the afternoon when my father showed me how to firmly plant the shotgun butt to my shoulder before pulling the trigger. When I pulled the trigger, another world opened up. And I clearly sensed this was about to happen again. And I wasn’t disappointed.

I can’t even guess how many radial engines I’ve sat behind and cranked into life, but none sang as sweet a song as those did. I counted the blades, as they came around, and could clearly feel when the mags were turned on. There were noticeable pulses through the airframe as the mixture caught and blue smoke started past me in shallow coughs. Then the coughing settled into that raspy purr that only round motors make.

I glanced over at my father. He was reading a magazine. My mother was fiddling with something. Neither were aware of the magical process that was under way. They were oblivious to the way an inanimate machine had suddenly come to life. I’m certain that if they had been studying me, they would have seen the transformation. They would have been aware of me stepping over a boundary into a new world. A world that would suck me in and forever be my home. They hadn’t really lost me, but from that moment on, they were going to have to share me with a bigger life.

When the power came up and the airplane started down the runway, electricity was flowing through my veins. Even as I type this, I can picture the view, and recapture the feeling, of the tail coming off the ground. It’s as if it happened 15 minutes ago. Then the rumbling stopped and the ground dropped away. In that instant, I saw the oh-so-familiar countryside from an entirely different perspective. And I haven’t been the same since.

As I think about it, I have yet to come down from that first flight. I don’t think any aviator does. Once you’ve been up, some people can never come down again. It’s a wondrously beautiful thing.

 

 

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